Calling All Retirees – What’s Your Best Advice?

Remember I told you about my friend who is nearing retirement?  I tried give him as many pointers as I could.  But then I came to the realization – “Hey wait!  That’s just little old us, and we are pretty abnormal by some folks standards.

And it occurred to me that in this beautiful little blogosphere we share, there are people far wiser than me.  So I’m going to put it out there for all of you!

What is the one piece of advice
you wish someone had given you
prior to your retirement?

I’m not talking about the financial stuff – there’s plenty of info out there about that.  I’m talking about the stuff you would want your best friend to know if he or she was about to take this retirement voyage.  I mean the nitty – gritty, day-to-day, “If only I’d known…” kind of stuff.

So I’d appreciate it if you’d leave your BEST advice in the comments.  Then pass this post around to your retired friends so that they can add their two-cents worth!  In the end, I’ll put together a great big list with links.  Won’t that be awesome?  I thought so, too!

Teacher has given yet another assignment…Make sure your pencils (erm, computer keys) are sharp…No copying off your neighbor………………..BEGIN!

Lynn

Photo Credit: Joanna Kosinska ~ Unsplash

27 thoughts on “Calling All Retirees – What’s Your Best Advice?

  1. footloosefogeys

    Go out and have some adventures! Good physical health eventually fades away so you need to use it while you still have it. On the other hand, be careful about what you still do. If your knees give way after an hour skiing, it is time to quit.
    Someday you will be staying at a nice resort, and they will approach you about a membership. RUN AWAY!!! Resort timeshares are generally not worth it. Points or weeks, it is all a scam to get your money now for promised vacations in the future (subject to availability, after annual fees). DO NOT even go to the meeting, no matter what they dangle for bait!!

    Liked by 2 people

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  2. Laura Lee Carter

    My best advice from my post about being a prisoner to your own experiences! (https://adventuresofthenewoldfarts.com/2017/09/02/age-and-higher-levels-of-consciousness/)

    “Don’t just save up your bucks for retirement, prepare your mind for a whole new level of freedom. The older I get, the clearer my moment-to-moment choices become. It can be so freeing to stop your brain autopilot in its tracks, and begin to live a new life!”

    Liked by 1 person

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  3. Linda Granholm Myers

    Make a bucket list with three items for the next year. Mine were learning to teach English as a Second Language, participating in a Habitat for Humanity build somewhere where Hurricanes Katrina and Rita had hit in Louisiana, and taking a class in basic mediation. I did them all. Found out I don’t want to teach anything to anyone, found out since I’m afraid of heights I am useless on roofs, scaffolding or ladders, and found out mediation was a fabulous, fascinating thing to do with my time. Seven years later I am a certified mediator with at least 75 mediations under my belt – all as a volunteer.

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  4. travelswithfran

    I am learning to take my time to explore what is out there to do. I am participating in things that are outside of my area of expertise. I refuse to do anything related to my former job. I am discovering things that I am actually good at that I hadn’t done in the past and so broadening my interests. Most of all I am meeting people who also engage in the same activities and I am finding them very interesting.

    Liked by 2 people

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  5. Rachel McAlpine

    At 77 I’m starting to see that one day, retirement might be necessary. Not desirable for me personally — but necessary. So I am also looking forward to a flood of advice from other readers. I don’t expect any consensus, nor should there be.

    Liked by 1 person

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  6. Retirementallychallenged.com

    This isn’t exactly a “wish I had known…” but it’s the best advice I can think of:

    Make your health a priority. Staying healthy in retirement means having more fun, allows you to do the things you want for longer, and helps ensure that you can spend more of your money on the things you want rather than on costly medical care. The days of easy peasy fitness we enjoyed when we were younger are over… it takes some work, but it’s well worth the benefits.

    Liked by 5 people

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    1. Encore Voyage Post author

      Boy Janis, isn’t that the truth! It’s not easy anymore, and I’m not sure when exactly that happened! In any case, I think I agree with you that it needs to be right up there at the top! A motivator for sure! ~ Lynn

      Liked by 1 person

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  7. patwdoyle11

    Don’t listen to the “shoulds”. OK, listen to them for INSPIRATION, but not as what you actually should do. You will hear a lot of … “people like you should do this”; “this is the best thing to do”; “if you don’t do this, you’ll not be happy/fulfilled”. Spend time figuring out what is right for you based on your values, motivations, strengths, interests. Find your own path. It’s often hard, especially if you’ve just had work as your primary identity. There might be (OK, will be) false starts. It might take time & effort (OK, it will take time & effort) to really “know thyself”. Find the tribe that supports that learning journey.

    a couple of others (because I had a hard time with learning these)
    – Be OK with being a beginner (not the expert you’ve probably been in the past). Try things, say yes, be open to possibilities.
    – Focus on the positive – “an attitude of gratitude” will make everyday more joyful and satisfying.

    Liked by 1 person

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  8. snakesinthegrass2014

    I think Pat pretty much said what I’m thinking, but I’ll just echo her a bit: do what YOU want, not what others say is the best way. I literally spent the first year of my retirement taking long walks, sitting on the couch watching old movies on TV, reading more books than at any time in my life, and started my blog, I really wasn’t productive and didn’t care. I needed time to decompress. Later in my second year, I started to figure things out and eventually made my way back to my profession (libraries) via a part-time job. Hope this helps. – Marty

    Liked by 2 people

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    1. Encore Voyage Post author

      Marty, this is great! And so true, because I truly believe it’s a Voyage. It changes up as we go along. I think that “decompression” time is something many people might need…before taking the next steps. Thanks ~ Lynn

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  9. Shelley

    I suspect many of us led very structured lives during our working careers. I know I certainly did. I worked in an office so I had lots of casual, effortless contacts with people every day.

    Although I didn’t want to be as structured as I was during my work life, at some point, I realized I needed SOME structure..and a way to replace that effortless, casual human contact.
    I had belonged to the local Y while employed, but I only used the machines. Upon retirement I started enrolling in classes-yoga, zumba, pilates, weights. Just the right amount of structure (i’m not locked in; I can go or not go), and I love the contact with my new friends. All that, with the bonus of exercise, which just might keep me from needing physical therapy in the years to come.

    Oh yeah, the advice part: Figure out what you especially valued during your work life and what will be your retirement replacement.

    Liked by 1 person

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    1. Encore Voyage Post author

      Shelley, thanks so much for that great advice! I have many teacher friends who have retired at the same time. We make very deliberate plans to meet up – having lunch today! 🙂

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